Rehoming your Pet

You've decided you can no longer keep your dog...

Are you in the Military?
Are you in the military and thinking of giving up your pet because you are being deployed? You may just need foster care!

See the Military Pets FOSTER Project on the NetPets web site or Pet Foster Care For Military Personnel hosted by Alpha Tax Services.

The Central Illinois German Shepherd Dog Rescue does not endorse either organization. These links are provided as a service to those military personnel looking to find a foster home or to rehome their pets.

This rescue rarely takes in owner giveups.
We get numerous requests for taking in homeless Shepherds. Your request will be answered in the order of its urgency. Shelters and animal enforcement agencies take precedence over your dog. Why? Because we rescue German Shepherds in shelters and animal controls since these dogs have no advocates and are faced with death. You are your dog's advocate. Also, by removing German Shepherd Dogs from these facilities, spaces are opened up for other homeless dogs.

Animal controls often provide initial vaccinations and heartworm testing. Some organizations take care of the spay and neuters beforehand. These organizations also have very experienced animal handlers that can objectively evaluate the dog's behavior around other dogs, cats, children, and people even before calling our rescue. This saves us time, money, and other valuable resources, as well as allows our rescue and the animal welfare organizations to work together and rescue those German Shepherds that can be made ready for adoption out to families.

Humane Societies generally have a high rate of euthanizia
Don't think that taking your dog to a humane society will ensure that a rescue will pick him up. It is unlikely one will since we, like many other rescues, are usually overcrowded and most times are not accepting new dogs. This means that even if a shelter has an agreement with a rescue to notify them when a dog comes in, there is no guarantee that your dog won't be put down as you walk out the door. This happens far more often than one would like to believe.

Mostly, we believe that since an owner made a conscious choice to adopt a dog, an owner must now take the responsibility for finding their dog a new home. In rare instances, does an owner not have a choice!

NOTE: The owner (including anyone who takes on the responsibility of another pet) is ultimately 100% responsible for what happens to that pet. If a good samaritan takes a pet, rather that taking the pet to a shelter or pound, they are assuming responsibility for that pet.

A rescue is not a pound or a humane society.
Private rescues tend to have a different stance on private give-ups versus shelter and pound give-ups. Dogs at animal controls have no advocates and often have very limited time periods before facing death.

Animal controls often provide initial vaccinations and heartworm testing. Some organizations take care of the spay and neuters beforehand. These organizations also have very experienced animal handlers that can objectively evaluate the dog's behavior around other dogs, cats, children, and people even before calling our rescue.

This saves us time, money, and other valuable resources, as well as allows our rescue and the animal welfare organizations to work together and rescue those German Shepherds that can be made ready for adoption out to families.

Rescues ignore private give-ups, for the most part, because we do not want owner give-ups to feel good about what they are doing (and the prospect of your animal going into a private rescue is a much nicer thought than the shelter, since there is a much higher probability of euthanasia at the shelter).

Also, owner give-ups, at least in our records, have a much higher probability of having major behavior problems. Private rescues, for financial, professional, and for reasons of evaluation, prefer to remove dogs from shelters and pounds. These again, are also dogs that face death.

Dogs in private homes should have more options than underrepresented, incarcerated dogs.
Private rescues for the most part will not take dogs with major behavior issues, because we cannot place them for reasons of liability. Also, the fact is that we have multiple dogs, and a single problematic dogs can ruin routines and injure several other animals.

Remember that this is an all-volunteer group and we receive NO state or federal funding.
Only a tiny amount of people take it upon themselves to provide rescue services out of their homes, personal budgets and often the expenses of pet professionals who donate their time and services to save these dumped, abused, neglected, and irresponsibly discarded sweet animals.

All of the animals in rescue need to find homes as soon as possible to allow openings for the next needy animal.

There are never enough homes or rescues for those dogs being dumped by their owners.
The long term solution involves illegalization of puppy sales in both pet stores and by individuals, as well as the spaying and neutering of all pet dogs.

Those who are not a part of the solution, are a part of the problem.

Expectations
We have been concerned about is peoples' unrealistic expectations of private rescues and delusions that all dogs can find "a country home" or "a home without other dogs, kids, men, cats, etc...." We are simply trying to instill some sense of reality. We imagine this would offend and if people are shamed, then they probably needed the shame. However, most of the people we deal with have no shame, and the type of people that would avoid rescues, shelters, pounds, due to a dose of reality, wouldn't hesitate to leave their dog tied to a tree or dump them on a highway. Yes, these things do happen, but we are not responsible for shaming or driving these types of people away from rescue and endangering their animals. Their animals were endangered the day they became pets of those people. This is a reality, we cannot save or be responsible for all of these animals.

Remember, there are far too many dogs out there without advocates that can use our help. We must allocate our resources in an effective way. We are sorry that reading the truth has been found offensive by some. Sometimes the truth hurts.

Please spay and neuter your dog and, when possible, explain to others why this is an important part of dog ownership.

Special Circumstances
Do you feel you have special circumstances that would merit your pet being brought into our program before a dog that is now in a pound or humane society? If so, you may email us at rescue@gsdhaven.org

Contact other Rescues
You can search for other German Shepherd Rescues in your area by going to Petfinder.com and clicking on the "Animal Shelter" link.

Some rescues will post a photo of your pet to their website and even Petfinder.com.

Contact your vet.
Your vet may be able to give you direction as to how to find a home for your pet in your local area.

Adopt your pet out yourself
Petfinder.com will post pets for private individuals, however, these listings cannot include photos.

Charge a fee for your dog
If you adopt your pet out yourself, we suggest you charge a fee since there are many very bad people out there that will want your pet to sell to animal testing facilities and dog fighting rings (to use as bait).

Greedy, evil people who do this are looking for a free dog. They are typically not interested in dogs that they have to pay for. That is why an adoption fee will screen out  most of these bad people.

Even with an adoption fee though, some of these people may still want your dog. They will make it seem as though they are genuine, when in fact they will quickly turn over your pet to another individual for money.

This is why it is important that you make it clear that you intend to follow-up and stay involved in the dog's life.

We also suggest that you have the new owner sign a contract (view an example) that you can take back your dog if he/she is being mistreated or if the new owner can no longer care for the dog. This will help keep your dog from being dumped at a pound where the euthanasia rate may be as high as 89%.